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Owls

Copyright Barbara Samuelson 1997

Great Horned owl (Bubo virginainus) at the Alaska Raptor Rehabilitation Center, Sitka, Alaska. This Horned Owl had been imprinted on humans, so that it could not be released into the wild. See Owlets below!!!

Nocturnal hunting requires no colorful plumage, so most owls—both male and female—match the dull brown, daytime camouflage of this great horned owl. Smaller birds that spot a resting owl may mob it, drawing attention to its concealed perch. Other small animals are thus warned of the powerful talons and formidable 200 cm (80 in) wingspan of the nearby owl. A great horned owl keeps its food supply away from competitors (of both the same and different species) by defending a territory. Stan Osolinski, Oxford ScientificFilms/Library of Natural Sounds,Cornell Laboratory of Ornithology. All rights reserved.

Copyright Barbara Samuelson 2002

These Great Horned Owlets are in the crotch of a Monterey Pine. Great Horned Owls do not build nests but use a Crow or Raven nest or possibly a Red-tailed Hawk's nest. When one of those can't be found, the Great Horned Owl will use whatever is handy. Here you can see both of the Owlets. They about 4 weeks from hatching about March 16, 2002. (the open mouth is a yawn)

(Please click on thumbnail to view the full size photo.)

Barred Owl
Spotted Owl


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